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February 2017--Native Hops


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Native Hops



Dodonaea viscose

[doh-DOH-nee-uh  vis-KOH-suh] 

Family: Sapindaceae 

Names:  sticky hop bush, Dodonia, Florida Hopbush, Kayu Mesen 

Description:  Dense, spreading shrub or small tree with sticky, yellow-green, elliptic leaves up to 5 inches long.  Green-yellow flowers appear in summer, followed by round, black seeds in 3-winged cases.  Reaches a height of 10 feet. There is a purple variety. 

Cultivation: Requires a light well-drained soil in a sunny position. Succeeds in almost any fertile soil and in a hot dry position. Resists drought, salt winds and pollution.
Plants are very wind hardy but are not resistant to frost. Plants are difficult to transplant when they are more than 60 centimetres tall.  Polymorphic, there are a number of sub-species.  Dioecious. Seed - sow spring in a greenhouse. The seed can be slow to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots once they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a fairly sunny part of the greenhouse for at least their first winter. If trying them outdoors, then plant them out in early summer of their second or third year's growth after the last expected frosts and give them some protection from the cold for their next winter or two. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame.  Hardy to Zone 9. Leaves are picked in summer and used fresh for gargles and poultices or dried for infusions. 

History: Names after Rembert Dodoens (1517-85) a Flemish royal physician and professor of medicine at Leiden, who published a herbal in 1554. 

Constituents: up to 18% tannins 

Properties: Anodyne; Diaphoretic; Febrifuge; Odontalgic; Vulnerary. 

Medicinal Uses: Internally used for fevers.  Externally for pain relief of toothache, sore throat, wounds, and stings.  The leaves are apparently effective in the treatment of toothache if they are chewed without swallowing the juice.The bark is employed in astringent baths and poultices 

Culinary Uses: The bitter fruits are a substitute for hops and yeast in making beer 

References:
The Encyclopedia of Herbs and Their Uses

Plants for a Future Database
 

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The Herb Growing & Marketing Network
Maureen Rogers, Director
PO Box 245, Silver Spring, PA 17575-0245
717-393-3295; FAX: 717-393-9261

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